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book1

Observing Variable Stars

Gerry A. Good (The Patrick Moore Practical Astronomy Series)
Springer Science & Business Media, 06.12.2012 - 284.
Dostępna min. na amazon.com

Observing variable stars is one of the major contributions amateur astronomers make to science. There are 36,000 variable stars listed in the General Catalogue of Variable Stars, so it is clearly impossible for the limited number of professional observatories to target even the majority of them. That's where amateur astronomers come in - thousands of them turning their telescopes to the sky every night. Variable star observing is the most popular of "real science" activities for amateurs, and Gerry Good's book provides everything needed. The first part of the book provides a highly detailed account of the various classes of variable star, with examples, illustrations and physical descriptions. The second section covers practical aspects of observing, everything from preparation and planning, through observing techniques, to data management and reduction.

book1

Understanding Variable Stars

John R. Percy
Cambridge University Press, 24.05.2007.
D
ostępna min. na amazon.com; http://bookzz.org/book/497732/bba6b0

This book was first published in 2007. Variable stars are those that change brightness. Their variability may be due to geometric processes such as rotation, or eclipse by a companion star, or physical processes such as vibration, flares, or cataclysmic explosions. In each case, variable stars provide unique information about the properties of stars, and the processes that go on within them. This book provides a concise overview of variable stars, including a historical perspective, an introduction to stars in general, the techniques for discovering and studying variable stars, and a description of the main types of variable stars. It ends with short reflections about the connection between the study of variable stars, and research, education, amateur astronomy, and public interest in astronomy. This book is intended for anyone with some background knowledge of astronomy, but is especially suitable for undergraduate students and experienced amateur astronomers who can contribute to our understanding of these important stars.

book1

Observing Variable Stars: A Guide for the Beginner

David H. Levy
Cambridge University Press, 15.12.2005 - 262.
D
ostępna min. na amazon.com; http://bookzz.org/book/873675/53d3cd

Found throughout the universe, variable stars are fascinating objects to observe. Their brightness changes over time and they can easily be seen with even the most basic equipment. David Levy explains how to begin electronic (or CCD) observing, as well as how to observe variable stars through a small telescope or binoculars. Featuring a section on Southern hemisphere stars, this book covers various types of objects that can be observed by amateur astronomers, including more exotic phenomena like gamma ray bursts, blazars, and polars. It will motivate anyone with even a basic interest in astronomy to begin observing variable stars. David H. Levy is one of the most successful comet hunters in history. He has discovered twenty-one, eight of them using a telescope in his own backyard. With Eugene and Carolyn Shoemaker at the Palomar Observatory in California, Levy discovered Shoemaker-Levy 9, the comet that collided with Jupiter in 1994, and is currently involved with the Jarnac Comet Survey, based at the Jarnac Observatory in Vail, Arizona. In addition to being the author or editor of 31 books and other products, David Levy is the Science Editor for Parade magazine and contributing editor for Sky and Telescope magazine and the Canadian periodical, SkyNews. Frequently interviewed in the media, he has given almost a thousand lectures and appeared on many television programs. His most recent CUP book is David Levy's Guide to Observing and Discovering Comets (Cambridge, 2003). First Edition Pb (1989) 0-521-62755-9

book4

Observing Variable Stars, Novae and Supernovae

Gerald North, Nick James
Cambridge University Press, 21.08.2014 - 242. Dostępna min. na amazon.com

Gerald North's complete practical guide and resource package instructs amateur astronomers in observing and monitoring variable stars and other objects of variable brightness. Descriptions of the objects are accompanied by explanations of the background astrophysics, providing readers with real insight into what they are observing at the telescope. The main instrumental requirements for observing and estimating the brightness of objects by visual means and by CCD photometry are detailed, and there is advice on the selection of equipment. The book contains a CD-ROM packed with resources, including hundreds of light-curves and over 600 printable finder charts. Containing extensive practical advice, this comprehensive guide is an invaluable resource for amateur astronomers of all levels, from novices to more advanced observers. Gerald North is a lifelong amateur astronomer. In addition to being a member of the British Astronomical Association since 1977, he is also the author of many books, including Advanced Amateur Astronomy (Cambridge, 1997) and Observing the Moon (Cambridge, 2000).

book4

Observing the Sun (Practical Astronomy Handbooks)

Peter O. Taylor
Cambridge University Press, 21.11.1991 - 159. Dostępna min. na amazon.com

Observing the sun is one of the most interesting and rewarding facets of astronomy to which amateurs can contribute meaningful data. It is the one branch of astronomy that requires only modest equipment and that can be pursued during the day. Peter Taylor, long-time chairman of the Solar Division of the American Association of Variable Star Observers, is a keen and highly experienced observer of the Sun. In this book he explains in a clear and practical way everything that a telescope user needs to know in order to make solar observations. The book deals with such topics as the historical background of solar observing, choice of equipment for the safe conduct of solar observations, observations of sunspots, and reporting observations. New techniques, such as electronic recording and the operations of radio telescopes, are also included. The level of presentation is understandable to anyone with basic astronomical knowledge and some experience in handling a small telescope.

book4

The Sun and How to Observe It

Jamey L. Jenkins
Springer Science & Business Media, 01.03.2009 - 206. ostępna min. na amazon.com

In Part 1, the book describes the very latest thinking on solar physics in (mostly non-mathematical) detail, incorporating the latest results from research concerning the structure and behaviour of the Sun. There is particular emphasis on the surface features visible from the Earth, and how these are the result of the extraordinary processes that are taking place within the Sun. In Part 2, the book details the techniques for observing and imaging the Sun with commercially-available equipment. The many recent advances in optical equipment now allow amateur astronomers to observe phenomena that until recently could only be seen with the extremely expensive equipment available at universities and research observatories – notably H-alpha and Calcium-K telescopes. This is a completely up-to-date solar observing book, while providing the science background necessary for an understanding of the observations with the latest equipment. It also features the most complete solar observing and imaging guide available

book6

Light Curves of Variable Stars: A Pictorial Atlas

C. Sterken, C. Jaschek
Cambridge University Press, 29.09.2005 - 252.
Dostępna min. na amazon.com; http://bookzz.org/book/2059687/a90961

This unique volume provides a complete reference on variable stars. It presents a wealth of typical light- and colour-curves to allow identification, together with a detailed and up-to-date description of each subclass. The editors, together with seven other world experts, have created a unique pictorial atlas of variable stars. In the first chapter they give a clear introduction to the nomenclature and classification of the light curves of variable stars, and to photometric systems. In the remaining chapters they provide a detailed account of each subclass: from eruptive, pulsating, rotating and cataclysmic variables, through to eclipsing-binary systems and X-ray binaries. Specific variable stars, types and classes of variables, together with key astrophysical terms can be quickly and easily located in the book by means of detailed object-name and subject indexes. This comprehensive and up-to-date volume provides an essential reference for all those interested in variable stars - from researchers and graduate students through to dedicated amateurs.

book7

Advancing Variable Star Astronomy

Thomas R. Williams
Cambridge University Press, 26.05.2011.
D
ostępna min. na amazon.com; http://bookzz.org/book/1223915/4bbadb

Founded in 1911, the AAVSO boasts over 1200 members and observers and is the world's largest non-profit organization dedicated to variable star observation. This timely book marks the AAVSO's centennial year, presenting an authoritative and accurate history of this important association. Writing in an engaging and accessible style, the authors move chronologically through five eras of the AAVSO, discussing the evolution of its structure and purpose. Throughout the text, the main focus is on the thousands of individuals whose contributions have made the AAVSO's progress possible. Describing a century of interaction between amateur and professional astronomers, the authors celebrate the collaborative relationships that have existed over the years. As the definitive history of the first hundred years of the AAVSO, this text has broad appeal and will be of interest to amateur and professional astronomers, as well as historians and sociologists of science in general.

book8

Cataclysmic Variable Stars - How and Why they Vary

Coel Hellier
Springer Praxis Books; October 10, 2008. Dostępna min. na amazon.com

This unique volume provides a complete reference on variable stars. It presents a wealth of typical light- and colour-curves to allow identification, together with a detailed and up-to-date description of each subclass. The editors, together with seven other world experts, have created a unique pictorial atlas of variable stars. In the first chapter they give a clear introduction to the nomenclature and classification of the light curves of variable stars, and to photometric systems. In the remaining chapters they provide a detailed account of each subclass: from eruptive, pulsating, rotating and cataclysmic variables, through to eclipsing-binary systems and X-ray binaries. Specific variable stars, types and classes of variables, together with key astrophysical terms can be quickly and easily located in the book by means of detailed object-name and subject indexes. This comprehensive and up-to-date volume provides an essential reference for all those interested in variable stars - from researchers and graduate students through to dedicated amateurs.

book9

Cataclysmic Variable Stars

Brian Warner
Cambridge Astrophysics Series. Dostępna min. na amazon.com

The study of cataclysmic variables - interacting binary stars containing a white dwarf accreting from an orbiting companion - is undergoing an exciting renaissance, as it embraces observations at all wavelengths. Cataclysmic variables allow, in particular, the direct and detailed study of equilibrium and non-equilibrium accretion discs; in turn these developments also help in our understanding of X-ray binaries, black holes and active galactic nuclei. This timely volume provides the first comprehensive survey of cataclysmic variable stars, integrating theory and observation into a single, synthesised text. An introductory chapter gives the historical background of studies of cataclysmic variables. The author then goes on to give an up-to-date review of both the observations (at all wavelengths, and over all time-scales), the theories, the models of the structures and accretion processes believed to be involved. A very detailed bibliography is also provided to guide the reader to pertinent primary literature.

book10

An Introduction to Astronomical Photometry Using CCDs 

W. Romanishin
University of Oklahoma, 2006
Dostępna za free: CCD_photometry.pdf

This book began as a set of lecture notes for an undergraduate course entitled “Observatory Methods” that I teach each year at the University of Oklahoma (OU). The book is intended as an introduction for the college astrophysics major to photometry in the optical region of the spectrum of astronomical objects using CCD imaging from groundbased telescopes. Of course, in these times of Giga-buck satellite telescopes of various sorts, groundbased optical astronomy is only a part of observational astronomy. Within groundbased optical astronomy, spectroscopy, only briefly mentioned here, probably takes up as much or more telescope time as photometry. That said, it is still obvious that imaging photometry is an important part of observational astronomy. With the ready availability of inexpensive CCDs and computer power, even a small telescope can provide an important “hand on” learning experience not readily available with large, oversubscribed research telescope, or remote satellite observatories....

book11

Stars and Stellar Evolution 

K.S De Boer, W. Seggewiss
EDP Sciences, 2008 333
Dostępna za free: Stars_and_Stellar.pdf

Most of the baryonic mass in galaxies is stored in stars, and stars are the objects we can see easily. Stars come in a large variety of shapes and states, reflecting the different possibilities nature has, as well as the fact that stars evolve in the course of their lives. The functioning and behaviour of stars is, of course, based on two levels of physics. One level is that of large scale structure. It is governed by gravity, macroscopic gas physics, and the way energy is transported through gas. The other level is that of microphysics. This includes the processes of nuclear fusion, the physical state of the gas (also under extreme conditions), and the effects chemical composition and ionization structure have on the energy transport by radiation and convection. The intimate interplay between the two levels, together with the fusion-driven changes taking place inside the star, make “stars and stellar evolution” a fascinating and very broad topic. Moreover, stars need not exist all by themselves (as the Sun does) but may exist in pairs, which can come to intensive interactions during their evolution...

 

 Materiały filmowe

 

Inne
 

Photometry - II. Differential and High-Speed Photometry
http://optical-astronomy.education/onewebmedia/phot2.pdf

Variable Stars – II. Pulsating stars
http://optical-astronomy.education/onewebmedia/var2.pdf

 

 

Czytany 1668 razy Ostatnio zmieniany niedziela, 04 grudzień 2016 15:19

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